Why Maintain Your Septic System

Maintain Your Septic System

Why Maintain Your Septic System

Why Maintain Your Septic System

Septic system upkeep is crucial for three reasons.

  • The first reason has to do with money. Septic systems that fail are costly to maintain and restore, and insufficient homeowner care is a significant causative factor system failure. In relation to the total of a new system, septic system includes so little preventative maintenance.
  • The wellness of your families, society, and surroundings is the second and most crucial reason to maintain your system properly. Poorly treated home wastewater is dumped into the environment whenever septic systems fail.
  • Contact with untreated human faeces can put people’s health at danger. Septic system failure can contaminate adjacent wells, groundwater, and drinking water sources.
  • Chemicals that are incorrectly disposed of through a septic system might contaminate local water sources and cause early system failure. As a result, homeowners should learn what may and cannot be disposed of through a septic system.
  • The economic health of your community is a third reason to maintain your septic system. Property values can be affected by failing septic systems. Building permits for these properties are sometimes denied.
  • Additionally, malfunctioning septic systems may lead to the contamination of local rivers, lakes, and shorelines used for commercial or recreational purposes in your town.

Saves You Money

Saves You Money

Compared to the expense of repairing and maintaining a failing system, that might cost around $3,000 and $7,000 for conventional systems, routine maintenance charges of $250 to $500 per 3 to 5 years is an absolute bargain.

Alternative methods can be even more expensive than traditional methods. The number of people living in the residence and the capacity of the network measure the timing of pumping needed.

Protects the Value of Your Home

Protects the Value of Your Home

A septic system that is unworkable or in disrepair can reduce the value of your home and may expose you to a hefty legal risk.

Preserves the Health of you and your Neighbors

Preserves the Health of you and your Neighbors

There are bacteria and viruses that can cause illness in household wastewater, in addition to high levels of nitrogen and phosphorus.

The majority of these pollutants can be removed by a well-maintained septic system. Water contamination caused by improperly handled sewerage from cesspools can lead to human and animal diseases.

Swimmers are at risk of contracting different infectious ailments, from eye and ear infections to acute gastrointestinal illness and hepatitis, if sewage is not properly cleaned.

The Ecosystem Is Safeguarded

The Ecosystem Is Safeguarded

Daily, more than four billion gallons of wastewater are buried below. If home wastewater is not properly handled, it can contaminate groundwater, which can be harmful to both drinking water and the environment.

Bacteria, viruses, and harmful substances are released into local waterways when septic systems fail.

Pollutants leaked from the ground end up polluting local waterways and ecosystems by killing native plants as well as fish and shellfish.

Regularly Inspect and Maintain Your Septic System

Regularly Inspect and Maintain Your Septic System

Maintaining your septic system can extend its lifespan. On-site System Maintainers may inspect and monitor your septic system on a regular basis.

  • Gravity systems: 3 years
  • Systems for distributing pressure: Annually
  • ATU, membrane bioreactor, drip irrigation, and other proprietary systems: Once a year, or more often if necessary by the manufacturer.
  • It is recommended that you replace your mound or sand filtration system every year

Pump Your Septic Tank as Needed

Pump Your Septic Tank as Needed

It Depends on how much water is used in the family and/or company. Water flow increases as the number of individuals using your septic system increases.

Because of this, your septic tank will fill up quicker, necessitating additional pumping. Septic tank lids should be kept tightly closed and locked.

Unscrewed lids pose a safety threat! Unsecured tanks can cause someone to fall in. You should check that the tank access lids are not damaged or degraded to prevent any accidents.

Be Water-Wise

Be Water-Wise

Your septic system’s lifespan may be extended if you use less water. Too much water usage is a common cause of system failure. Land and roof drains should be diverted away from the drainage field

It’s possible that this extra water will prohibit the drainfield from working correctly as a result.

Landscape with Love

Landscape with Love Septic System

As far as septic tanks and drainfields are concerned, grass is the greatest choice. It is possible to employ other types of plants with shallow root systems as well for landscaping purposes.

Septic tank lids should always be within easy reach. Installation of “risers” will reduce the time and cost of septic tank pumping/monitoring.

A “riser” also reduces the amount of mess and interruption in your yard when pumping and monitoring.

Use a Garbage Disposal

Use a Garbage Disposal

Garbage disposals add particles and grease to your drainfield, which may quickly pile up and plug it. If you really must use one, try to keep it to a minimum.

Nothing but toilet paper should be flushed into your septic system. Cleaning wipes, baby wipes, facial tissue, personal care items, and paper towels should not be flushed.

Even wipes labelled as flushable or septic-safe should be thrown away.

Put Household Chemicals Down the Drain

Put Household Chemicals Down the Drain

Chemicals kill microorganisms that are needed to break down solids in your system. Long-term use of antibiotics, for example, can kill vital bacteria in your septic tank and drainfield.

Vehicles should not be parked on your drainfield, reserve space, or septic tank. Patios, carports, decks, storage facilities, sports courts, landscaping plastic, and grazing animals should also be kept away from the drain field and drainfield reserve zones.

This will keep soils from compacting and pipes from bursting.

Use Septic Tank Additives

Use Septic Tank Additives

These items may be hazardous to your drainfield because they contribute more sediments to the system, which can block it. Groundwater and surface water can both be polluted by the pollutants.

Water from Hot Tubs Should Be Drained into the Septic Tank

Water from Hot Tubs Should Be Drained into the Septic Tank

Large amounts of water can cause your drainfield to ‘drown,’ and chlorine can kill essential microorganisms in your septic tank and drain field. Drain hot tubs, especially the drainfield, from the system.

Maintaining Your Septic System

Maintaining Your Septic System

Pump Your Tank

Pump Your Tank

According to the number of people living in your house and the size of your septic tank, we recommend inspecting your conventional tank every 3 to 5 years at the very least.

Every 1-2 years, a house may require more regular pumping. Waste water may be released without sufficient time for treatment and particle separation if the septic tank has not been drained out in five or more years.

Groundwater contamination or clogging of drainfields may result. The frequency of pumping will depend on whether you have a Best Available Technology (BAT) unit or not.

Add an Outlet Filter to the Septic Tank

Add an Outlet Filter to the Septic Tank

To prevent scum and sludge from reaching your absorption area, insert filters in the exit baffle. The filter can be cleaned annually by a septic professional.

Fill Your Buried Manhole with a Riser

Fill Your Buried Manhole with a Riser

Pumping your tank through the manhole will be required by septic professionals. This is especially true if the manhole is buried.

To make things easier for professionals and cheaper for you, we recommend installing a riser to allow access to the manhole from below the earth.

Don’t Flood Your System

Don’t Flood Your System

To allow scum and sludge to settle, septic tanks must be left alone for a period of time. If you rush too much water through your tank, it won’t be able to accomplish its job properly.

Showers, laundry, and dishwashing should all be scheduled in advance to avoid flooding your tank. Any leaking faucets or toilets should be repaired as soon as possible.

Be Cautious About What You Flush Down Your Drains and Toilets

Be Cautious About What You Flush Down Your Drains and Toilets

Consider flushing only water, human waste, and toilet paper down the toilet. Utilize your waste disposal sparingly.

Don’t let your system be clogged with greasy substances like grease, feminine products, cigarettes, baby wipes, chemicals, or expired/unused medicine.

Even if a product claims to be flushable or biodegradable, that doesn’t apply to a septic tank system. Spend less money by eliminating the use of unnecessary additives in your septic system.

All the helpful bacteria you need to maintain a healthy system can be found in regular flushing.

Inspect Your System for Signs of Trouble

Inspect Your System for Signs of Trouble

1. Explore your property and keep an eye out for
2. Overflowing drain fields or wet regions
3. Some sludge particles may have blocked the drain field, and tree roots or damaged pipes may be preventing the wastewater from spreading across the drain field as intended.
4. The amount of water used in residence may have surpassed the system’s design capacity.
5. Here, instead of moving through the soil as it should, waste water rises to the top, posing significant health risks and producing unpleasant odors.
6. Water in the toilets is slowing down or clogging up.
7. It is possible for the basement to be flooded with sewage in the worst situations.
8. Congested sewage lines leading to the tank, a clogged inlet or exit pipe, a full septic tank, or an ineffective drainfield might cause this.
9. In the home, above the tank and drain field, or from the vent pipe, sewage scents are present.
10. If the system is working properly, there shouldn’t be any smells. It’s possible that smells are an indication that the system is malfunctioning if they are present.


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

How to Clean Septic Tank Naturally?

How much baking soda do I put in my septic tank? You can mix about a 1/4 cup of baking soda with 1/2 cup of vinegar and 2 tablespoons lemon to make your own natural cleaning agent. The baking soda will fizz up to help get the dirt and grime in your tub and drains.

How Much Does It Cost to Pump a Septic Tank?

The average cost to pump a septic tank is about $400, though the price can range between $225–$600 for most residential tanks.

How Much Does It Cost to Empty a Septic Tank?

On average, it costs $417 or between $287 and $555 to clean or pump a septic tank. Extremely large tanks can run $1,000 or more. Most tanks need pumping every three to five years.

How Much Does It Cost to Drain a Septic Tank?

$275–$580. The national average cost to clean and pump a septic tank is between $295 and $610 with most people spending around $375. Depending on the size of your septic tank, pumping could cost as low as $250 for a 750-gallon tank, or as high as $895 for a 1,250-gallon tank.

How Much Does It Cost to Clean a Septic Tank?

The national average cost to clean and pump a septic tank is between $295 and $610 with most people spending around $375. Depending on the size of your septic tank, pumping could cost as low as $250 for a 750-gallon tank, or as high as $895 for a 1,250-gallon tank. Get free estimates from septic professionals near you.

How Does a Septic Tank Work?

The septic tank is a buried, water-tight container usually made of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene. Its job is to hold the wastewater long enough to allow solids to settle down to the bottom forming sludge, while the oil and grease floats to the top as scum.

How Does a Septic System Work?

In conventional, or soil-based systems, the liquid (known as effluent) is discharged from the septic tank into a series of perforated pipes buried in a leach field, chambers, or other special units designed to slowly release the effluent into the soil. This area is known as the drainfield.

How Does a Septic Tank System Work?

A septic tank system acts as a storage tank and treatment location for sewage. It consists of a holding tank, and a drain field. In the tank, enzymes work to naturally break down organic waste, while liquid wastewater from the tank is discharged slowly into the sediment of the drain field.

Septic Tank Maintenance Checklist

The Ultimate Septic Tank Maintenance Checklist
  • Schedule a septic pumping every 2-3 years. …
  • Only flush things that are meant to be flushed. …
  • Keep cooking oil away from the garbage disposal. …
  • Save water. …
  • Watch the lawn. …
  • Dispose of household chemicals properly. …
  • Plant trees away from your drainfield.

Septic Tank Maintenance

  • Pump the Septic Tank Regularly.
  • Inspect the System for Leaks.
  • Clearly Mark off and Maintain the Leach Field.
  • Limit Water Usage and Household Waste.
  • Use a Bacteria Additive.
  • Install an Effluent Filter.
  • Check the Leach Field for Clogs.
  • Keep Accurate Maintenance Records.

Septic Tank Maintenance Tips

8 Well and Septic Tank Maintenance Tips to Keep Things Flowing Smoothly
  1. Ask Questions. …
  2. Test the System Every Year. …
  3. Be Careful About What Goes Down the Drain. …
  4. Avoid Using the Garbage Disposal. …
  5. Keep the Lid on the System. …
  6. Conserve Water. …
  7. Protect the Drainfield. …
  8. Protect the Well.

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