All About Fix SrtTrail.txt BSOD Error in Windows 7. Disable Automatic Repair

All About Fix SrtTrail.txt BSOD Error in Windows 7. Disable Automatic Repair

The SrtTrail.txt BSOD error is a common issue that many Windows 7 users encounter. This error prevents the computer from booting up properly, leaving users frustrated and unsure of how to fix it. One potential solution for this problem is to disable automatic repair, which can be a tricky process for those who are not familiar with Windows 7. In this article, we will discuss all the necessary information you need to know about the SrtTrail.txt BSOD error and provide step-by-step instructions on how to disable automatic repair in Windows 7. By the end, you will have a better understanding of this error and the steps needed to resolve it.

How to Fix SrtTrail.txt BSOD Error in Windows? | 7. Disable Automatic Repair

If you are a Windows user, chances are you have encountered the dreaded Blue Screen of Death (BSOD) at some point. One common BSOD error in Windows is the SrtTrail.txt error, which can cause your computer to crash and display a blue screen with the error message “Your PC ran into a problem and needs to restart. We’re just collecting some error info, and then we’ll restart for you.”

This error is often caused by corrupted system files or a problematic drive. But don’t worry, in this blog post, we will discuss how to fix the SrtTrail.txt BSOD error in Windows.

1. Use System Restore

If you have recently installed a new device driver or made changes to your system, this could be the cause of the SrtTrail.txt error. In this case, you can use System Restore to revert your system back to a previous state where it was functioning properly.

To do this, follow these steps:

1. Restart your computer and press F8 repeatedly until you see the Advanced Boot Options menu.

2. Select “Repair Your Computer” and press Enter.

3. Select your language, time and currency, and keyboard or input method and click Next.

4. Click on System Restore and select a previous restore point from the list.

5. Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the system restore process.

2. Run the System File Checker

The System File Checker (SFC) is a built-in tool in Windows that checks for any corrupted or missing system files and replaces them with the correct versions. This can help fix the SrtTrail.txt error, as it is often caused by corrupted system files.

To run the System File Checker, follow these steps:

1. Press the Windows key + X and click on Command Prompt (Admin).

2. In the Command Prompt, type in “sfc /scannow” without the quotes and press Enter.

3. The SFC will now scan your system for any corrupted files and replace them if necessary.

4. Once the scan is complete, restart your computer and check if the error is resolved.

3. Run CHKDSK

CHKDSK (Check Disk) is another built-in tool in Windows that scans your hard drive for any errors and attempts to fix them. If the SrtTrail.txt error is caused by a problematic drive, running CHKDSK can help resolve the issue.

To run CHKDSK, follow these steps:

1. Press the Windows key + X and click on Command Prompt (Admin).

2. In the Command Prompt, type in “chkdsk c: /f” without the quotes and press Enter. (Note: Replace “c” with the drive letter of the drive you want to scan.)

3. If prompted, press Y to schedule the scan for the next system restart.

4. Restart your computer and let the scan complete.

4. Remove Recently Installed Hardware or Software

If you have recently installed new hardware or software, it could be the cause of the SrtTrail.txt error. Try removing the hardware or uninstalling the software to see if the error goes away. This will help identify the source of the problem and you can then decide whether to reinstall the hardware or software or look for an alternative.

5. Perform a Clean Boot

If none of the above solutions work, you can try performing a clean boot to identify if any third-party software is causing the SrtTrail.txt error. A clean boot starts

1. Restore your System from System Restore Point

System Restore is a feature built into Microsoft Windows that allows users to restore their computer system to a previous state. This can be helpful in cases where your system is experiencing errors, crashes, or other problems. By creating a restore point, you can go back to a point in time when your system was functioning properly.

Here’s how to restore your system from a system restore point:

Step 1: Access System Restore

The first step is to access the System Restore feature. To do this, go to the Start menu and type “System Restore” in the search bar. Click on the “Create a restore point” option from the search results.

Step 2: Choose a Restore Point

In the System Properties window, click on the “System Protection” tab and then click on the “System Restore” button. This will open the System Restore window. Here, you will see a list of available restore points. You can select a specific restore point that you want to revert to by clicking on it and then clicking on the “Next” button.

Step 3: Start the Restore Process

After selecting a restore point, click on the “Next” button to start the restore process. A confirmation window will appear, click on the “Finish” button to confirm. System Restore will then start the restoration process, which may take a few minutes.

Step 4: Restart Your Computer

Once the restore process is complete, you will be prompted to restart your computer. Click on “Yes” to restart your computer. After restarting, your system will be restored to the selected restore point.

Step 5: Verify the Restore

After your computer restarts, check if the system has been restored to the desired state. If the issue you were experiencing has been resolved, then the system restore was successful.

Important Points to Keep in Mind

– System Restore will not affect your personal files or documents, but any newly installed programs or updates will be removed.
– It is recommended to create a restore point before installing any new software or making changes to your system.
– System Restore points are only available for a limited time. To ensure that you have an available restore point, it is recommended to create a new one every few weeks.
– If the issue persists even after restoring to a previous point, you can undo the restore process or try restoring to a different restore point.

Conclusion

System Restore is a handy feature that can help you revert your system to a previous stable state. It is a useful troubleshooting tool when your system is experiencing problems. By following the steps mentioned above, you can easily restore your system to a previous point and get it back to a functional state. Remember to keep creating restore points regularly to have a safety net in case of any future issues.

2. Repair the Boot Files on your device

2. Repair the Boot Files on your device

If you are experiencing issues with your device not booting up properly or flashing error messages related to the boot files, it may be necessary to repair them. The boot files are responsible for starting up the operating system when the device is turned on, and any errors or corruption in these files can result in a malfunctioning device.

Fortunately, repairing the boot files is a fairly simple process that can be done easily by following the steps outlined below.

Step 1: Boot into Safe Mode
The first step is to boot your device into safe mode. This allows your device to start up with only the essential programs and drivers necessary for it to function. To boot into safe mode, follow these steps:
1. Turn off your device completely.
2. Press the power button to turn it back on.
3. As soon as the device starts booting, continuously press the F8 or Shift + F8 key until a boot menu appears.
4. Use the arrow keys to select “Safe Mode” and press Enter.

Step 2: Run the System File Checker
Once your device has booted into safe mode, you can use the System File Checker (SFC) tool to scan for and repair any corrupted system files, including the boot files.
1. Open the Command Prompt as an administrator by pressing the Windows key + X and selecting “Command Prompt (Admin).”
2. Type “sfc /scannow” and press Enter.
3. The SFC tool will now scan your device for any errors and repair them automatically.

Step 3: Rebuild the BCD (Boot Configuration Data)
If the SFC tool did not fix the issue with your boot files, you can try rebuilding the BCD. BCD is a database that contains information about how the operating system should boot. To rebuild the BCD, follow these steps:
1. In the Command Prompt, type “bootrec /rebuildbcd” and press Enter.
2. You will be prompted to select the Windows installation. If you have multiple installations on your device, choose the one you want to repair and press Enter.
3. The BCD will now be rebuilt, and any corrupt data will be replaced.

Step 4: Use Automatic Repair
If the above methods did not work, you can try using the Automatic Repair feature in Windows. This feature will scan your device for any startup issues and attempt to fix them.
1. Boot into the Windows Recovery Environment by turning off your device completely and then turning it back on while continuously pressing the F8 or Shift + F8 key.
2. Select “Troubleshoot” > “Advanced Options” > “Startup Repair.”
3. Follow the on-screen instructions to let the automatic repair process run.

Step 5: Reinstall Windows (as a last resort)
If none of the above methods work, you can try reinstalling Windows. This will erase all your data, so make sure you have a backup before attempting this.
1. Boot into the Windows Recovery Environment as described in Step 4 above.
2. Select “Troubleshoot” > “Reset this PC” > “Remove everything.”
3. Follow the on-screen instructions to reinstall Windows.

In conclusion, repairing the boot files on your device may be necessary if you are experiencing startup issues. It is a straightforward process and can be done by following the steps outlined above. If the issue persists, it is best to seek professional help or contact the manufacturer for further assistance.

3. Reboot the System in Safe Mode with Networking

Welcome to my tech blog! Today, we are going to talk about how to reboot your system in safe mode with networking.

First, let’s understand why rebooting in safe mode with networking can be useful. Safe mode is a diagnostic mode in Windows that allows you to troubleshoot issues with your system. It starts your computer with only the necessary drivers and software, making it easier to identify and fix any problems. Safe mode with networking, on the other hand, adds internet connectivity to safe mode, allowing you to access the internet and perform online troubleshooting or updates.

Now, let’s get into the steps to reboot your system in safe mode with networking:

1. Start by shutting down your computer. If you are unable to do so, you can force shut it down by pressing and holding the power button for a few seconds.

2. Once your computer is off, press the power button to turn it back on.

3. As the computer starts up, continuously press the F8 key on your keyboard until you see the Advanced Boot Options screen. If you have Windows 8 or 10, you may need to hold the Shift key while pressing the Restart button on the login screen.

4. On the Advanced Boot Options screen, use the arrow keys on your keyboard to select “Safe Mode with Networking” and press Enter.

5. Your computer will start in safe mode with networking, and you will be prompted to enter your login information.

6. After logging in, you can access the internet and perform any necessary troubleshooting or updates.

When you are finished working in safe mode, you can simply restart your computer to boot back into normal mode.

Another way to access safe mode with networking is through the System Configuration tool:

1. Press the Windows key + R on your keyboard to open the Run dialog box.

2. Type “msconfig” and click OK.

3. In the System Configuration window, go to the Boot tab.

4. Under Boot options, check the box next to “Safe boot” and select “Network” from the dropdown menu.

5. Click Apply and then OK.

6. A prompt will appear asking if you want to restart your computer now or later. Choose Restart to boot into safe mode with networking immediately.

6. When you are ready to switch back to normal mode, simply follow the same steps and uncheck the “Safe boot” option under the Boot tab.

Rebooting in safe mode with networking can be a useful tool when troubleshooting issues with your computer or performing updates that may not be possible in normal mode. I hope this guide was helpful and if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to leave them in the comments below. Thanks for reading and stay tuned for more tech tips and tricks on my blog!

4. Reset your System

Resetting your system can be a useful solution when you encounter performance issues, glitches, or want to start fresh with your device. It essentially wipes the slate clean and gives your system a clean start. Here’s how you can reset your system, whether it’s a computer, phone, or tablet.

1. Back up your data

Before resetting your system, it’s important to back up all your important data. This includes photos, videos, documents, and any other files that you want to keep. You can back up your data by using an external hard drive, cloud storage, or transferring it to another device.

2. Reset from Settings

The easiest way to reset your system is through the settings. This can be done on most devices such as Windows computers, Android phones, and iPhones. Go to the settings menu and look for the reset option. It may be found under “Update & Security” on a computer, “System” on an Android phone, and “General” on an iPhone. Follow the prompts to complete the reset process.

3. Use recovery mode

If your system is not functioning properly or you can’t access the settings, you can use recovery mode to reset it. The steps may vary depending on your device, but generally, you need to press a combination of buttons to enter recovery mode. From there, you can choose the option to reset your device.

4. Reinstall the operating system

In some cases, a reset may not be enough to fix the issues on your system. In such cases, you might need to reinstall the operating system. This is a more advanced method and should only be done if you have experience with it. You can find instructions on how to reinstall the operating system from the manufacturer’s website or support forums.

Note: Before resetting your system, make sure you have the necessary equipment such as a charger, and you are connected to a stable internet connection. Also, be patient as the process may take some time depending on your device.

In conclusion, resetting your system can be a quick and easy way to fix performance issues and start fresh. However, make sure to back up your data and understand the process before proceeding. If the issues persist after resetting, it may be time to seek professional help or consider upgrading to a newer device.

5. Disable the Early Launch Anti-Malware Protection

5. Disable the Early Launch Anti-Malware Protection

In today’s technological landscape, the threat of malware looms large and it is crucial for users to take necessary measures to protect their devices from potential attacks. One of the key defense mechanisms against malware is Early Launch Anti-Malware (ELAM) protection, which is a security feature built into Windows 10 operating system. ELAM protects PCs during the startup process by loading and validating anti-malware drivers before any other non-Microsoft drivers. However, there may be instances where you need to disable ELAM protection for various reasons. In this blog, we will discuss five ways to disable Early Launch Anti-Malware Protection.

1. Manually disable ELAM protection through BIOS:
The most direct way to disable ELAM protection is by accessing the BIOS (Basic Input/Output System) of your computer. This process will vary depending on the device you are using, but generally, it entails pressing a specific key (such as F2, F12, or Esc) during the startup process to enter the BIOS. Once in the BIOS, navigate to the Security or Advanced options and look for the Early Launch Anti-Malware Protection setting. Disable it, save the changes, and exit the BIOS.

2. Disable ELAM through Group Policy:
If you are using a Windows 10 Pro or Enterprise version, you can disable ELAM through Group Policy Editor. Press Windows key + R and type “gpedit.msc” to open the editor. Go to Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > System > Early Launch Anti-malware and double-click on “Do not use Early Launch Anti-Malware to load antimalware during boot-up.” Select “Enabled” and click “Apply” to disable ELAM protection.

3. Use Command Prompt:
You can also disable ELAM protection through Command Prompt, which is a text-based user interface where you can execute commands. Press Windows key + R and type “cmd” to open Command Prompt. Type “bcdedit /set {current} {ELAM disabled}” and hit Enter. This will disable Early Launch Anti-Malware Protection. You can check if it is disabled by typing “bcdedit /enum” and looking for “ELAM disabled” under Windows Boot Loader.

4. Use Windows Defender:
Windows Defender is a built-in anti-malware program that comes with Windows 10. To disable ELAM through Windows Defender, open it and go to “Virus & threat protection settings.” Scroll down to “Manage settings” and turn off “Use Early Launch Anti-Malware Protection”. This will disable ELAM protection on your device.

5. Use third-party tools:
There are also third-party tools available that can help you disable ELAM protection. One such tool is Autoruns, which allows you to manage programs that are configured to run automatically during system startup. You can disable ELAM by unchecking the box next to “ELAM” in the “Boot Execute” tab. However, third-party tools may not work for all devices, so it is best to research and choose a reliable and compatible tool.

In conclusion, Early Launch Anti-Malware Protection is an essential security feature, and disabling it should only be done if absolutely necessary. It is recommended to re-enable it once the specific task is completed to ensure ongoing device protection against malware. Stay vigilant and use these methods carefully to disable ELAM only when needed for a smooth and secure computing experience.

6. Run a CHKDSK Command on your Windows OS

If you’re a Windows user, you may have encountered issues with your computer’s performance or experienced sudden crashes and errors. One of the common causes behind these problems could be corrupt or bad sectors on your hard drive. These bad sectors can lead to data loss or even system crashes if left unaddressed. Luckily, there’s a built-in Windows tool called CHKDSK (Check Disk) that can help you detect and repair these bad sectors on your hard drive.

In this blog post, we’ll guide you through how to run a CHKDSK command on your Windows OS and hopefully, help you fix any underlying issues with your hard drive.

What is CHKDSK Command?

CHKDSK is a built-in Windows utility that checks the file system for errors and repairs any detected issues. It’s an important tool for maintaining the health of your hard drive and can be used to fix problems with the file system, bad sectors, and logical errors.

There are several ways to run a CHKDSK command, and we’ll cover the three most common methods below.

Method 1: Using Command Prompt

Step 1: Open Command Prompt as an administrator. To do this, press the Windows key + X on your keyboard and select Command Prompt (Admin) from the list of options.

Step 2: A Command Prompt window will open. Type in “chkdsk C: /f /r” and press Enter. (Note: C is the drive letter of the hard drive you want to run CHKDSK on. If you want to run it on a different drive, replace C with the respective drive letter.)

Step 3: The CHKDSK utility will start scanning your hard drive for errors and fix them if any are found.

Step 4: Once the process is completed, you’ll see a message stating “Windows has made corrections to the file system.” This means that CHKDSK has successfully repaired any detected issues on your hard drive.

Method 2: Using Windows File Explorer

Step 1: Open File Explorer by pressing the Windows key + E.

Step 2: Right-click on the drive you want to run CHKDSK on, and select Properties from the context menu.

Step 3: In the Properties window, select the Tools tab and click on the Check button under the Error checking section.

Step 4: A new window will open with two options – “Scan drive” and “Scan and repair drive.” Select the latter option and click on Start.

Step 5: This will start a CHKDSK scan on your hard drive, and any detected errors will be fixed automatically.

Method 3: Using the Windows Recovery Environment

Step 1: Boot your computer using a Windows installation media (DVD or USB).

Step 2: On the Windows Setup screen, select your language and click on Next.

Step 3: Click on Repair your computer.

Step 4: In the Troubleshoot menu, select Command Prompt.

Step 5: Type in “chkdsk C: /f /r” and press Enter. (Note: Just like in Method 1, C is the drive letter of the hard drive you want to run CHKDSK on.)

Step 6: The CHKDSK utility will start scanning your hard drive for errors and repair them if any are found.

Step 7: Once the process is completed, you can exit the Command Prompt and restart your computer.

Final Thoughts

CHKDSK

8. Run a System File Checker

System File Checker is a built-in Windows tool that helps scan and repair any corrupted or damaged system files. It is a useful tool for resolving various system issues, such as crashes, freezes, and other errors. Here’s how to run System File Checker on your Windows PC:

Step 1: Open the Command Prompt

Go to the Start menu and type “cmd” in the search bar. Right-click on the Command Prompt and select “Run as administrator.” This will open a new Command Prompt window with administrator privileges.

Step 2: Type the Command

In the Command Prompt window, type “sfc /scannow” and hit Enter. This will initiate the System File Checker tool and start scanning for any corrupted or damaged system files.

Step 3: Wait for the Scan to Complete

The scanning process may take a while, depending on the size and condition of your system files. During the scan, you will see a progress bar indicating the percentage of completion.

Step 4: Fix any Corrupted or Damaged Files

If the System File Checker finds any corrupted or damaged files, it will automatically replace them with a cached copy that is located in a compressed folder at %WinDir%\System32\dllcache. You may be prompted to insert your Windows installation disc if some files are missing from the cache.

Step 5: Restart Your Computer

Once the scan and repair process is completed, you will see a message stating, “Windows Resource Protection found corrupt files and successfully repaired them.” Now, restart your computer for the changes to take effect.

You can also view the detailed log file of the scan, which is located at %WinDir%\Logs\CBS\CBS.log. If you encounter any issues during the scan, you can refer to this log file for troubleshooting.

System File Checker is a handy tool for fixing common system errors, and it is recommended to run this tool periodically to keep your system files in check. It is also a good idea to back up your important files before running System File Checker, as it may make changes to your system files.

9. Disable Secure Boot on Windows

9. Disable Secure Boot on Windows

Secure Boot is a security feature that was first introduced in Windows 8 to protect the Windows operating system from being compromised by malicious software during the booting process. It verifies that every piece of software or hardware that is loaded during the boot process is digitally signed by a trusted source. This prevents the loading of unauthorized or malicious code and ensures a more secure booting experience.

However, there may be situations where you need to disable Secure Boot on your Windows device. For example, if you want to dual boot with another operating system that is not signed by a trusted source, or if you want to install a custom operating system or make changes to your hardware.

Here’s how you can disable Secure Boot on Windows:

1. Restart your computer and enter the BIOS setup by pressing the designated key during the boot process. The key varies from device to device, but common keys are F2, F10, F12, or ESC.

2. Once in the BIOS setup, go to the Security tab using the arrow keys on your keyboard.

3. Look for an option called “Secure Boot,” “Trusted Boot,” or “Boot Security” and select it.

4. Use the arrow keys to navigate to the “Secure Boot” option and press Enter.

5. Use the arrow keys to select “Disabled” and then press Enter.

6. Save the changes and exit the BIOS setup. The key to save and exit may be F10 or a similar key.

7. Your computer will boot normally, and Secure Boot will be disabled.

If you encounter any issues or are unable to find the option to disable Secure Boot in your BIOS, it could be because your computer manufacturer has locked it down. In that case, you can try contacting them for assistance or search for specific instructions for your computer model online.

It is important to note that disabling Secure Boot will make your device more vulnerable to malware attacks during the boot process. Therefore, it is recommended to only disable it if absolutely necessary, and to re-enable it once you are done with the installation or changes that require it to be disabled.

In conclusion, Secure Boot is an essential security feature that helps protect your Windows device from malicious attacks during booting. However, if you need to disable it for certain purposes, follow the steps mentioned above, and remember to re-enable it afterwards for better security.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the SrtTrail.txt BSOD error in Windows 7 can be a frustrating and unexpected issue for users. However, by following the steps outlined in this article, you can easily fix the error and disable automatic repair. It is important to regularly update your Windows 7 and drivers to prevent this error from occurring. Additionally, always be cautious when making changes to your system and make sure to create backups. With the right knowledge and a bit of troubleshooting, you can overcome the SrtTrail.txt BSOD error and continue using your Windows 7 system smoothly.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *