All About Fix FileHistory Error 201 on Windows 10

All About Fix FileHistory Error 201 on Windows 10

Windows 10 offers numerous features and capabilities that make it stand out from its predecessors. One such feature is the File History tool, which allows users to backup and restore their files easily. However, like any other technology, File History is not immune to errors and glitches. One common error that users might encounter is the FileHistory Error 201. This error can cause frustration and hinder the backup process, but with the right knowledge and troubleshooting steps, it can be easily resolved. In this article, we will delve into the details of FileHistory Error 201 and provide solutions to help you fix this issue on your Windows 10 device.

How to Fix FileHistory Error 201 on Windows 10

FileHistory is a built-in feature in Windows 10 that allows users to automatically back up their files to an external drive or network location. However, some users have reported encountering FileHistory Error 201, which prevents them from using this feature. In this article, we will discuss the possible causes and solutions for this error.

Causes of FileHistory Error 201:

1. Corrupted System Files: If your system files are corrupted, it can lead to FileHistory Error 201.

2. Outdated Drivers: Outdated or corrupt drivers can also cause this error.

3. Invalid Registry Keys: Invalid registry keys can also interfere with the functioning of FileHistory and result in Error 201.

4. Security Software: Some security software might block FileHistory from running properly and cause this error.

5. Corrupted FileHistory Cache: A corrupted FileHistory cache can also trigger Error 201.

Solutions to Fix FileHistory Error 201 on Windows 10:

Solution 1: Restart the FileHistory Service

1. Open the Windows Services Manager by pressing Windows Key + R and then type “services.msc” in the Run box and hit Enter.

2. In the Services window, scroll down to locate “FileHistory Service” and double-click on it.

3. In the Service Properties window, click on the “Stop” button to stop the service.

4. Now, click on the “Start” button to restart the service.

5. Close the Services window and check if the error is resolved.

Solution 2: Run Windows Troubleshooter

1. Press Windows Key + I to open the Settings app and go to Update & Security.

2. Click on Troubleshoot from the left pane and then click on “Additional Troubleshooters” on the right side of the window.

3. Scroll down and click on “Windows Store Apps” to run the troubleshooter.

4. Follow the on-screen instructions and let the troubleshooter fix any issues it finds.

5. Restart your system and check if the error is resolved.

Solution 3: Clear FileHistory Cache

1. Press Windows Key + R to open the Run box and type “services.msc” and press Enter to open the Services window.

2. In the Services window, locate the “FileHistory Service” and double-click on it.

3. In the Service Properties window, click on the “Stop” button to stop the service.

4. Now, navigate to C:\Users\username\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\FileHistory\ and delete all the files in this folder.

5. Close the Services window and restart the FileHistory service.

Solution 4: Update Device Drivers

1. Press Windows Key + X and select Device Manager from the list.

2. In the Device Manager, expand the categories and locate any devices with a yellow exclamation mark next to them. This indicates outdated or corrupt drivers.

3. Right-click on the device and select “Update driver.”

4. Follow the on-screen instructions to update the driver.

5. Repeat these steps for all the devices with a yellow exclamation mark.

Solution 5: Disable Security Software

1. If you have any third-party security software installed, try temporarily disabling it to see if it is causing the error.

2. Right-click on the security software’s icon in the system tray and select “Disable” or “Pause protection.”

3. If the error is resolved, you may need

Method 1: Removing Special Characters from Filename

In today’s digital age, we are constantly creating and sharing files with each other. However, sometimes our filenames can contain special characters that can cause compatibility issues or make it difficult to access the file. This not only creates inconvenience but can also lead to errors and loss of important data. In such cases, it becomes necessary to remove these special characters from the filename. Here are some methods to easily remove special characters from a filename.

Method 1: Using the Command Prompt (Windows)

Step 1: Open the Command Prompt by pressing the Windows and R keys together and typing “cmd” in the Run dialog box.

Step 2: Navigate to the folder where the file with the special character in its name is located. You can use the “cd” command followed by the folder name to change the directory.

Step 3: Type the command “ren” followed by the name of the file with the special character, a space, and the new name you want to give the file. For example, if the file name is “My File(1).txt”, you can rename it to “My File.txt” by typing the command “ren ‘My File(1).txt’ ‘My File.txt’ ” (without the single quotes).

Step 4: Press Enter and the special character will be removed from the file name.

Method 2: Renaming the File (Mac OS)

Step 1: Right-click on the file with the special character in its name and select “Get Info”.

Step 2: In the pop-up window, click on the file name and press the Enter key.

Step 3: The name will now be editable. Use the backspace or delete key to remove the special character.

Step 4: Once done, click on “Save” to change the file name.

Method 3: Using Third-party Software

There are various third-party software available that can help you remove special characters from a filename in bulk. Some popular options are Advanced Renamer, Bulk Rename Utility, and Adobe Bridge (for batch renaming of files).

Using any of these tools, you can select multiple files with special characters in their name and rename them with just a few clicks.

In conclusion, special characters in filenames can cause problems when sharing or accessing files. With the methods mentioned above, you can easily remove these characters and ensure compatibility and efficient file management.

Method 2: Shrinking the File Path/name

Method 2: Shrinking the File Path/name

When it comes to managing files on your computer, one important aspect to consider is the length of the file path and file name. A long file path refers to the sequence of folders and subfolders that lead to the specific file, while the file name is the actual name of the file itself.

Having a long file path and file name can cause issues such as difficulty in finding and accessing the file, or conflicts with certain software programs that have character limits for file paths and names. In order to avoid these problems, one solution is to shrink the file path and name.

Here are some methods to help you shrink the file path and name without losing any of the file’s content:

1. Use abbreviations and acronyms: You can use abbreviations or acronyms for frequently used words in the file path and name. For example, instead of writing “Documents,” you can use “Doc” or “Dcmts.”

2. Use numbers instead of words: Instead of writing out the full number, you can use numerical digits to represent it. For example, instead of writing “Eighteen,” you can use “18.”

3. Rename folders and subfolders: If you have folders and subfolders with long names in the file path, you can rename them to shorter names. Just make sure to keep their organization and hierarchy intact.

4. Remove unnecessary words or punctuation: Words like “and,” “or,” “the,” or punctuation marks such as commas, dashes, and underscores can be removed from the file name to make it shorter.

5. Shorten the file name: If possible, try to shorten the actual file name itself. You can use the first few letters of each word or use commonly recognized abbreviations for the file type.

6. Use a file path/name shortening tool: There are software tools available that can automatically shorten file paths and names for you. These tools analyze the file path/name and suggest changes that can help make it shorter.

By using these methods, you can effectively shrink the file path and name without losing any of the file’s content. This will not only make it easier to manage and access the file, but it can also improve the overall performance of your computer. Keeping your file paths and names short and concise is an important aspect of file organization and management.

Method 3: Running the File and Folder Troubleshooter

Technology has become an essential part of our daily lives and we heavily rely on it for various tasks. However, sometimes technology can also bring us headaches, especially when it comes to managing files and folders on our devices. It can be frustrating when you encounter errors while trying to access or use your files and folders. Luckily, there is a solution to this problem – running the File and Folder Troubleshooter.

The File and Folder Troubleshooter is a built-in tool in Windows that can help diagnose and fix issues related to files and folders. It can detect and resolve problems such as file corruption, missing or damaged system files, and permission issues. Here’s how to use it to solve your file and folder woes.

Step 1: Open the Control Panel
First, open the Control Panel on your Windows computer. To do this, press the Windows key on your keyboard and type “Control Panel”. Then click on the Control Panel app from the search results.

Step 2: Search for Troubleshooting
In the Control Panel window, type “Troubleshooting” in the search bar located in the top-right corner. Then, click on the “Troubleshooting” option that appears.

Step 3: Open the File and Folder Troubleshooter
In the Troubleshooting window, click on the “View all” option on the left-hand side. This will display a list of all the troubleshooters available on your computer. Scroll down and find the “File and Folder Troubleshooter” option. Double-click on it to open it.

Step 4: Run the Troubleshooter
Once the File and Folder Troubleshooter window opens, click on the “Advanced” option at the bottom of the window. This will open up a new window with additional options. Check the box next to “Apply repairs automatically” and then click “Next”.

Step 5: Select the Type of Problem
In the next window, the troubleshooter will ask you what type of problem you are experiencing. You can either choose “Files don’t appear in search results” or “File and folder problems” depending on your issue.

Step 6: Wait for the Troubleshooter to Complete
The troubleshooter will now scan your computer and try to detect and fix any issues related to files and folders. This process may take a few minutes. Once the troubleshooter completes its task, it will display a report of the problems found and fixed.

Step 7: Restart your Computer
After the troubleshooter completes its task, restart your computer to apply the changes.

The File and Folder Troubleshooter is a helpful tool that can save you a lot of time and frustration. It can solve various problems related to files and folders and make your experience using technology smoother. So the next time you encounter any file or folder issues, remember to run the troubleshooter first before trying any other solutions.

Method 4: Install every Pending Windows Update

Windows updates are important for maintaining the security and stability of your computer system. These updates often include bug fixes, performance improvements, and security patches. However, it’s not uncommon to have some pending updates that have not been installed. In this blog post, we will discuss how installing every pending Windows update can help improve your computer’s performance and protect it from potential security threats.

Method 4: Install every Pending Windows Update

Step 1: Open the Windows Update Settings

The first step is to open the Windows Update settings. You can either search for “Windows Update” in the Windows search bar or go to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update.

Step 2: Check for Updates

Once you are in the Windows Update settings, click on the “Check for updates” button. This will initiate a search for all available updates for your system.

Step 3: Install all Pending Updates

After the search is complete, you will see a list of available updates. Click on the “Install updates” button to install all the pending updates.

Note: It is recommended to close all open programs before installing updates.

Step 4: Restart your Computer

Once the updates are installed, your computer will prompt you to restart. Click on “Restart now” to complete the installation process.

Step 5: Repeat the Process if Necessary

In some cases, there might be updates that require a restart to complete the installation. After your computer restarts, repeat the process by going back to the Windows Update settings and checking for updates again. Install any pending updates and restart your computer if necessary.

Benefits of Installing every Pending Windows Update

1. Improves Performance

Updating your computer with the latest Windows updates can improve its performance. These updates often include bug fixes and performance improvements that can make your computer run more smoothly.

2. Fixes Security Vulnerabilities

Microsoft regularly releases security updates to fix any potential vulnerabilities in the Windows operating system. By installing every pending update, you are ensuring that your computer is protected from any potential security threats.

3. Enhances Compatibility

Updating your computer with the latest Windows updates can also improve compatibility with newer software and hardware. This can help prevent any issues with running programs or using new devices on your computer.

In conclusion, installing every pending Windows update is crucial for maintaining the security and performance of your computer. By regularly checking for updates and installing them, you can ensure that your computer is running smoothly and protected from any potential security threats. So, don’t neglect those pending updates and make sure to install them to keep your system running at its best.

Method 5: Performing SFC and DISM scans

Method 5: Performing SFC and DISM scans

As a tech blogger, one of the most common issues I come across is the slow performance or malfunctions of computers. These issues can be caused by a variety of reasons, such as software conflicts, corrupted files, or even hardware problems. One method that I have found to be effective in fixing these issues is performing System File Checker (SFC) and Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM) scans.

What are SFC and DISM scans?
System File Checker is a built-in Windows utility that scans for damaged or missing system files and replaces them with the cached versions located within the WinSxS folder. This folder contains all the operating system files that are needed for Windows to function properly. On the other hand, DISM is a command-line tool that can be used to repair and prepare Windows images.

Why should you perform SFC and DISM scans?
Performing these scans can help to resolve various system issues, including:

1. Corrupted or missing system files: Sometimes, due to various reasons, system files can become corrupted or get deleted. This can result in system malfunctions or slow performance. SFC and DISM scans can help to replace or repair these files, restoring the system to its original functioning state.

2. Software conflicts: Sometimes, when you install new software, it can conflict with existing system files, causing instability or crashes. SFC and DISM scans can help to repair any damaged files and resolve these conflicts.

3. Malware infections: Malware can often target important system files, causing damage or corruption. SFC and DISM scans can help to repair these files and get rid of any malware infections.

How to perform SFC and DISM scans?
Performing these scans is a fairly simple process. Here’s how to do it:

1. Open the Command Prompt as an administrator by right-clicking on the Start menu and selecting “Command Prompt (Admin).”

2. In the Command Prompt window, type the command “sfc /scannow” and hit Enter. This will start the SFC scan.

3. Once the scan is complete, you will see the results. If any errors are found, SFC will attempt to fix them. You may need to restart your computer for the changes to take effect.

4. If the SFC scan is unable to fix the issues, you can proceed to run a DISM scan. In the Command Prompt window, type the command “DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth” and hit Enter. This will start the DISM scan.

5. Once the scan is complete, you will see the results. If any issues are found, DISM will attempt to fix them.

In some cases, you may need to use the Windows installation media to perform these scans. However, for most users, the above steps should suffice.

In conclusion, performing SFC and DISM scans can help to resolve various system issues and improve the overall performance of your computer. If you are experiencing slow performance or system malfunctions, I highly recommend trying out these scans before seeking any other solutions. They are easy to perform and can save you a lot of time and effort in the long run.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Fix FileHistory Error 201 on Windows 10 is a common issue that many users experience when using the File History backup tool. However, with the right troubleshooting steps and solutions, this error can be easily fixed and prevent the loss of important files. Some of the common causes of this error include corrupt files, incorrect settings, and outdated drivers. By following the steps outlined in this article, users can resolve the FileHistory Error 201 and ensure that their data is always backed up securely. It is important to regularly check for updates and maintain good system health to avoid facing this error in the future. By proactively addressing this issue, users can have a seamless experience with the File History tool and have peace of mind knowing that their

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